Microneedling: What You Need to Know

Microneedling, a new technology in cosmetic surgery, actually dates back to 1995. Microneedling is a helpful and especially effective solution for individuals wishing to remove mild scars, boost hair growth, or increase collagen production. Dermatologists have performed extensive research on microneedling to decipher the multi-purpose treatment.

Microneedling produces microscopic punctures in the skin

This unique technique rejuvenates the skin by embedding very fine tiny needles into the skin that do not cause wounds, but enter the skin deep enough to stimulate your body’s healing process in deader layers of the skin. A roller containing the many tiny needles will be rolled across the skin to create these micro-punctures. Once the healing process is stimulated, new collagen and elastin are produced over time, leading to stronger, youthful-looking skin with improved blemishes. The dermaroller is a safe and effective microneedling device comprised of micro-fine needles that range from 0.5 – 2.5 millimeters in diameter.

Microneedling offers fairly immediate results

The results of microneedling are virtually immediate, causing the skin to look luminous, radiant, and supple for a few weeks by increasing blood flow to the area. The inflammation from the needles delivers a glow to the skin in addition to a superficial swelling. The skin will be left feeling soft and hydrated, especially with the use of an aftercare moisturizer and other skin care products.

Microneedling promises improvement over time

After your microneedling session, new collagen and elastin will continue to be produced, leading to improved skin over time. It can take several months for the full results to be seen. A 2008 study reported that four microneedling sessions a month increased the elastin and collagen to up to 400%. The results become prominent six months after the completion of the treatment sessions. As new collagen is generated, the skin becomes stronger and younger-looking with improved elasticity. After optimal treatment sessions, patients can enjoy fewer fine lines and wrinkles, improved acne scars and blemishes, and better skin tone and texture for overall facial rejuvenation.

Microneedling arouses dormant hair follicles

When performed on the scalp, microneedling can stimulate the healing process, leading to increased blood flow and cell regeneration. This can lead to an increase in hair growth to treat thinning hair or balding. A research study conducted on 100 people divided into two groups proved the significant role of microneedling in hair growth. The first group was treated with minoxidil lotion, while the second group was treated with minoxidil lotion and microneedling. 82% of those in the second group reported a 50% improvement in hair growth as compared to the first group where hair growth is reported by only 4.5% of participants.

Microneedling works well when paired with other skincare treatments

Microneedling alone offers long-lasting results, but is optimized further when coupled with lasers and topical treatments. Some anti-aging preparations work well with needle punctures. Microneedling creates channels in the skin to allow products to be more effectively absorbed. You can get the most out of your skin care products and treatments by receiving microneedling first. Microneedling can also be combined with PRP therapy, where your own blood cells are used during the microneedling process. your blood cells contain growth factors that can help you regenerate new skin cells, strengthening the skin. Combining microneedling with radiofrequency can also optimize tissue tightening.

Once-a-month Microneedling plan

For significant skin improvements, microneedling can be done once a month. Treatment sessions will be spaced out to give your skin enough time to heal. Your dermatologist can determine how many sessions you will need to reach your goal results. For more sever skin concerns, you will likely require more treatment sessions to see optimal results. Microneedling can then be performed in the future to maintain the strength and youth of your skin.

To learn more about microneedling or to get started with your treatment plan, contact our office today!

Get the Most out of Your Chemical Peel Treatment

Chemical peels are a great way to rejuvenate your face or improve more severe skin concerns by removing damaged layers of skin, revealing healthy skin underneath. When it comes to treatment, there are a few things you’ll want to ask yourself when choosing the type of peel that’s best for you. By considering these questions, you can get the most out of your chemical peel treatment:

Do you have a skin condition?

Common skin conditions such as psoriasis, eczema, or rosacea can be worsened by a chemical peel. If you suspect you have one of these or another skin condition, you might not be the best candidate for any type of chemical peel. However, you can talk with Dr. Mejia about other treatment options!

What are your concerns?

The next thing you should consider is how severe your skin concerns are. If you experience mild pigmentation concerns, rough texture, or an over-all dull appearance to your skin, you could benefit from a superficial peel, the mildest formula. If you have severe symptoms like deep wrinkles, sun damage, and age spots, you might require a deep peel for the most significant improvement! If your somewhere in-between with moderate signs of aging and blemishes, a medium peel might be just-right for you.

How much time do you have to recover?

The deeper the chemical peel, the more side effects, recovery time, and post-op care required after treatment. So, if you want to rejuvenate for an event in the near future, you might want to choose the superficial peel to get glowing skin without any severe redness or peeling. If you decide to go for a medium or deep peel, just keep in mind that you will likely experience more swelling, redness, and peeling after treatment. Many patients like to avoid social events until their skin has healed. No matter which type of peel you choose, be sure to avoid sun exposure for the first month or two as your skin will be extra sensitive while it heals.

Our board-certified dermatologist at Jupiter Dermatology can examine your skin and discuss your concerns to determine which type of peel is best for you. To schedule your consultation with Dr. Ricardo Mejia, contact our office today.

Get Clearer Skin with Clarisonic

At Jupiter Dermatology, we offer Clarisonic products to help our patients keep their skin healthy and radiant. When dead skin cells build up, it can cause the complexion to look dull and aged. These products are great tools to combat adult acne, clogged pores, and dull dead skin for a healthy glow. Read on to learn more about this product and how it works.

The Mia 2

The Mia 2 Clarisonic brush is a lightweight and portable cleansing device that gently exfoliates the skin. It comes with two different speeds, one for delicate skin and one for all skin types, so you can customize your cleansing experience. There are also interchangeable facial brush heads, which are each uniquely designed to address different skin types and conditions.

The Opal Sonic Infuser

The Opal Sonic Infuser is a smaller device, that is used to gradually build up the skin’s resilience. It works by gently tapping the skin at 200+ sonic movements per second, and is especially effective around the eyes. This product also helps the skin to absorb skincare products for maximum effect, and even comes with anti-aging sea serum to get you started.

It is important to keep your Clarisonic products clean for optimal results, as dirty brushes can spread unwanted bacteria. Also, be sure to change your cleansing brush head every three months. This is because the bristles on the brush heads become less effective over time.

If you are interested in learning more about these Clarisonic products and what they can do for you, contact Jupiter Dermatology today! We would be happy to answer any questions that you may have.

Acne Over The Counter Products

Used to treat mild, moderate and severe acne, the effectiveness of over-the-counter medications lies in the product’s active ingredient(s). Not all active ingredients work the same way. The active ingredient benzoyl peroxide reduces P. acnes(bacteria); whereas, salicylic acid helps correct abnormal skin shedding. For lesions to clear, the product(s) must be effective against the factor(s) causing the acne. The following describes common active ingredients used in over-the-counter acne medications sold in the United States. Check with your dermatologist or pharmacist before combining acne products.

Alcohol and acetone Found together in some over-the-counter medications used to treat acne, acetone works as a degreasing agent and alcohol has mild antimicrobial properties. When used alone, acetone tends to have no effect. Continue reading “Acne Over The Counter Products”

Physical Procedures for Treating Acne

A Dermatologist will occasionally use procedures to help clear acne. These methods, which are described below, should be performed by a dermatologist or other health care practitioner. Trying these at home can lead to infection, worsening of the acne and scarring.

Chemical PeelsLight chemical peels of glycolic acid and other chemical agents are used by dermatologists to loosen blackheads and decrease acne papules.

Comedo ExtractionSometimes removing comedones proves beneficial. To extract whiteheads and blackheads, dermatologists use a sterile pen-sized device. This procedure should only be performed by a dermatologist or other medical professional. Patients’ attempts to extract comedones and drain cysts by squeezing or picking, can lead to worsening of the acne, scarring and infection. Tissue injured by squeezing or picking can become infected by staphylococci, streptococci and other bacteria. Continue reading “Physical Procedures for Treating Acne”

7 Tips for Getting the Most Out of Your Acne Treatment

Good skin care plays an important role in treating acne. Following these skin care guidelines—unless your dermatologist instructs otherwise—can help improve treatment results:

Do NOT pop, squeeze or pick at acne.

This can make acne worse by spreading inflammation. With medical treatment, removing lesions is rarely necessary; however, when comedo removal is needed, it should be performed by an experienced healthcare professional.

Gently wash your face twice a day with a mild cleanser and pat dry.Acne is not caused by poor hygiene, and vigorous washing and scrubbing will not clear your skin. In fact, all that scrubbing can irritate your skin and make acne worse. The way to clear acne is with appropriate acne products and good skin care.

Continue reading “7 Tips for Getting the Most Out of Your Acne Treatment”

Acne FAQ

Would using my medication more frequently than prescribed speed up the clearing of my acne?

No. Always use your medication exactly as your dermatologist instructed. Using topical medications more often than prescribed may actually induce more irritation of the skin, redness and follicular plugging, which can delay clearing time. If oral medications are taken more frequently than prescribed, they won’t work any better, but there is a greater chance of side effects.

My topical treatment seems to work on the spots I treat, but I keep getting new acne blemishes. What should I do?

Topical acne medications are made to be used on all acne-prone areas, not just individual lesions. Part of the goal is to treat the skin before lesions can form and to prevent formation, not just to treat existing lesions. Patients are generally advised to treat all of the areas (forehead, cheeks, chin and nose) that tend to break out rather than just individual lesions.

My face is clear! Can I stop taking my medication now?

If your dermatologist says you can stop, then stop–but follow your dermatologist’s instructions. Many times patients will stop their medication suddenly only to have their acne flare up several weeks later. If you are using multiple products, it may be advisable to discontinue one medication at a time and judge results before discontinuing them all at once. Ask your dermatologist before you stop using any of your medications. Continue reading “Acne FAQ”

Acne Q & A Part I

What role does diet play in acne?

Acne is not caused by food. Following a strict diet will not clear your skin. While some people feel that their acne is aggravated by certain foods, particularly chocolate, colas, peanuts, shellfish and some fatty foods, there is no scientific evidence that suggests food causes or influences acne. Avoid any foods which seem to worsen your acne and, for your overall health, eat a balanced diet–but diet shouldn’t really matter if the acne is being appropriately treated.

Does the sun help acne?

Many patients feel that sunlight improves their acne lesions and go to great lengths to find sources of ultraviolet light. There is no proven effect of sunlight on acne. In addition, ultraviolet light in sunlight increases the risk of skin cancer and early aging of the skin. It is, therefore, not a recommended technique of acne management, especially since there are many other proven forms of treatment for acne. Moreover, many acne treatments increase the skin’s sensitivity to ultraviolet light, making the risk of ultraviolet light exposure all the worse.

What is the best way to treat acne?

Everyone’s acne must be treated individually. If you have not gotten good results from the acne products you have tried, consider seeing a dermatologist. Your dermatologist will decide which treatments are best for you. Generally, 2% salicylic acid cleansers and benzoyl peroxide gels are a good start. Continue reading “Acne Q & A Part I”

Causes of Acne

What causes acne?The causes of acne are linked to the changes that take place as young people mature from childhood to adolescence (puberty). The hormones that cause physical maturation also cause the sebaceous (oil) glands of the skin to produce more sebum (oil). The hormones with the greatest effect on sebaceous glands are androgens (male hormones), which are present in females as well as males, but in higher amounts in males.

Sebaceous glands are found together with a hair shaft in a unit called a sebaceous follicle. During puberty, the cells of the skin that line the follicle begin to shed more rapidly. In people who develop acne, cells shed and stick together more so than in people who do not develop acne. When cells mix with the increased amount of sebum being produced, they can plug the opening of the follicle. Meanwhile, the sebaceous glands continue to produce sebum, and the follicle swells up with sebum.
In addition, a normal skin bacteria called P. acnes, begins to multiply rapidly in the clogged hair follicle. In the process, these bacteria produce irritating substances that can cause inflammation. Sometimes, the wall of the follicle bursts, spreading inflammation to the surrounding skin. This is the process by which acne lesions, from blackheads to pimples to nodules, are formed. Continue reading “Causes of Acne”

Acne Myths

Acne Myths

Myth #1: Acne is caused by poor hygiene. If you believe this myth, and wash your skin hard and frequently, you can actually make your acne worse. Acne is not caused by dirt or surface skin oils. Although excess oils, dead skin and a day’s accumulation of dust on the skin looks unsightly, they should not be removed by hand scrubbing. Vigorous washing and scrubbing will actually irritate the skin and make acne worse. The best approach to hygiene and acne: Gently wash your face twice a day with a mild soap, pat dry–and use an appropriate acne treatment for the acne.

Myth #2: Acne is caused by diet. Extensive scientific studies have not found a connection between diet and acne. In other words, food does not cause acne. Not chocolate. Not french fries. Not pizza. Nonetheless, some people insist that certain foods affect their acne. In that case, avoid those foods. Besides, eating a balanced diet always makes sense. However, according to the scientific evidence, if acne is being treated properly, there’s no need to worry about food affecting the acne.

Myth #3: Acne is caused by stress. The ordinary stress of day-to-day living is not an important factor in acne. Severe stress that needs medical attention is sometimes treated with drugs that can cause acne as a side effect. If you think you may have acne related to a drug prescribed for stress or depression, you should consult your physician. Continue reading “Acne Myths”